You are here:  / News / Recent Posts / Science / Jupiter’s Little Red Spot up close: Juno reveals stunning image of 3,700 mile long storm

Jupiter’s Little Red Spot up close: Juno reveals stunning image of 3,700 mile long storm

 

View Detailed Gallery

The dynamic storm at the southern edge of Jupiter’s northern polar region and was first spotted in 1993
It is officially known as the North North Temperate Little Red Spot 1
The color varies between red and off-white, and it has a pale reddish core at its center

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. It was taken on July 10, 2017 at 6:42 p.m. PDT (9:42 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its seventh close flyby of Jupiter, and shows the North North Temperate Little Red Spot 1, the third largest anticyclonic oval on the planet which is typically around 3,700 miles (6,000 kilometers) long
Watch full  Video

While many of Juno’s images have focused on the planet’s mysterious giant red spot, its little brother has also been revealed in incredible detail by the probe.

The latest images show the dynamic storm at the southern edge of Jupiter’s northern polar region.
Officially known as the North North Temperate Little Red Spot 1 (NN-LRS-1); it has been tracked at least since 1993, and may be older still, according to NASA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The long-lived anticyclonic oval is the third largest anticyclonic oval on the planet, typically around 3,700 miles (6,000 kilometers) long.

The color varies between red and off-white (as it is now), but this JunoCam image shows that it still has a pale reddish core within the radius of maximum wind speeds.
An anticyclone is a weather phenomenon where winds around the storm flow in the direction opposite to that of the flow around a region of low pressure.

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager.
The image has been rotated so that the top of the image is actually the equatorial regions while the bottom of the image is of the northern polar regions of the planet.

Although the storm is huge, it is tiny compared to its ‘big brother’, the so-called ‘Great Red Spot’.
This violent storm, which in the late 1800s was estimated to be about 25,000 miles (about 40,000 km) in diameter – wide enough for three Earths to fit side by side.
The biggest storm in the solar system, it appears as a deep red orb surrounded by layers of pale yellow, orange and white.

Previous NASA releases have focused on Jupiter’s tumultuous ‘Great Red Spot’ has revealed what it might be like to glimpse the biggest storm in our solar system up close.

The image shows a natural colour rendition of the massive storm, based on data from the Juno spacecraft’s seventh close flyby of the planet, simulating how it would be seen by the human eye.

Juno captured the view from about 8,648 miles (13,917 kilometers) above the cloud tops using its JunoCam imager.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The new image was processed by citizen scientist Björn Jónsson, according to NASA, using data from Juno’s July 10 close approach.

‘This true-color image offers a natural color rendition of what the Great Red Spot and surrounding areas would look like to human eyes from Juno’s position,’ NASA explains.

‘The tumultuous atmospheric zones in and around the Great Red Spot are clearly visible.’
Just weeks ago, the space agency released the first images from the probe’s historic flyby of the ‘Great Red Spot.’
The probe, which has been monitoring Jupiter’s surface for just over a year, passed about 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometres) above the Great Red Spot.

The first three unprocessed ‘raw’ images were revealed by NASA as a taste of the images to come, and space enthusiasts soon tweaked them to produce stunning images.

‘Raw images from the Juno spacecraft’s flyby of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot are back on Earth,’ NASA said as it revealed the images.
‘We invite the public to act as a virtual imaging team, from identifying features of interest to sharing the finished images online.’
NASA is currently processing the images itself, and more are expected to be unveiled over the coming days.
‘After JunoCam data arrives on Earth, members of the public can process the images to create color pictures,’ it said.
‘The public also helps determine which points on the planet will be photographed.’
Experts have predict that the views of the storm will be breathtaking.
The data collection of the Great Red Spot is part of Juno’s sixth flyby over Jupiter’s mysterious cloud tops.

Perijove (the point at which an orbit comes closest to Jupiter’s center) was this morning at 02:55 BST (21:55 EDT yesterday evening).
At the time of perijove, Juno was about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) above the planet’s cloud tops.
Eleven minutes and 33 seconds later, Juno covered another 24,713 miles (39,771 kilometers) and was directly above the Great Red Spot.

The spacecraft passed about 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers) above the Giant Red Spot clouds.
All eight of the spacecraft’s instruments as well as its imager, JunoCam, were on during the flyby.
‘My latest Jupiter flyby is complete!’ said a post on the @NASAJuno Twitter account.

‘All science instruments and JunoCam were operating to collect data.’
‘Raw images will be posted in (the) coming days,’ the space agency said.
Juno launched on August 5, 2011, from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and has been orbiting Jupiter for just over one year.

The data collection of the Great Red Spot was part of Juno’s sixth flyby over Jupiter’s mysterious cloud tops.
Perijove (the point at which an orbit comes closest to Jupiter’s centre) was this morning at 02:55 BST (21:55 EDT yesterday evening).
At the time of perijove, Juno was about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) above the planet’s cloud tops.

Eleven minutes and 33 seconds later, Juno covered another 24,713 miles (39,771 kilometers) and was directly above the Great Red Spot.
The spacecraft passed about 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers) above the Giant Red Spot clouds.
All eight of the spacecraft’s instruments as well as its imager, JunoCam, were on during the flyby

The fly-by comes just days after Juno celebrated its first anniversary in Jupiter’s orbit.
‘Jupiter’s mysterious Great Red Spot is probably the best-known feature of Jupiter,’ said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.
‘This monumental storm has raged on the solar system’s biggest planet for centuries.
‘Now, Juno and her cloud-penetrating science instruments will dive in to see how deep the roots of this storm go, and help us understand how this giant storm works and what makes it so special.’

On July 4, Juno logged exactly one year in Jupiter orbit, and has chalked up about 71 million miles (114.5 million kilometers) in orbit around the giant planet.
‘The success of science collection at Jupiter is a testament to the dedication, creativity and technical abilities of the Nasa-Juno team,’ said Rick Nybakken, project manager for Juno from Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
‘Each new orbit brings us closer to the heart of Jupiter’s radiation belt, but so far the spacecraft has weathered the storm of electrons surrounding Jupiter better than we could have ever imagined.’
During its mission of exploration, Juno soars low over the planet’s cloud tops – as close as about 2,100 miles (3,400 kilometers).
During these flybys, Juno is probing beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and studying its auroras to learn more about the planet’s origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.
Early results from Nasa’s Juno mission portray the largest planet in our solar system as a turbulent world, with an intriguingly complex interior structure, energetic polar aurora, and huge polar cyclones.
The image of a crescent Jupiter and the iconic Great Red Spot was created by a citizen scientist (Roman Tkachenko) using data from Juno’s JunoCam instrument, Nasa said.

The image was taken on December 11, 2016 as the Juno spacecraft performed its third close flyby of Jupiter.
At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 285,100 miles (458,800 kilometers) from the planet.
Astronomers recently revealed that Jupiter’s ‘red spot’ storm, the biggest in the solar system, is shrinking.
The so-called ‘Great Red Spot’ is a violent storm, which in the late 1800s was estimated to be about 25,000 miles (about 40,000 km) in diameter – wide enough for three Earths to fit side by side.
The biggest in the solar system, it appears as a deep red orb surrounded by layers of pale yellow, orange and white.
Winds inside the storm have been measured at several hundreds of miles per hour, Nasa astronomers said.
Nasa revealed the find alongside stunning new maps of the planet which are the first in an annual series of ‘weather maps’ designed to spot changes.
Already, the Jupiter images have revealed a rare wave just north of the planet’s equator and a unique filamentary feature in the core of the Great Red Spot not seen previously.
‘Every time we look at Jupiter, we get tantalizing hints that something really exciting is going on,’ said Amy Simon, a planetary scientist at Nasa’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
‘This time is no exception.’
Collecting these yearly images will help current and future scientists see how these giant worlds change over time.

The observations are designed to capture a broad range of features, including winds, clouds, storms and atmospheric chemistry.
Ms Simon and her colleagues produced two global maps of Jupiter from observations made using Hubble’s high-performance Wide Field Camera 3.
The two maps represent nearly back-to-back rotations of the planet, making it possible to determine the speeds of Jupiter’s winds.
The new images confirm that the Great Red Spot continues to shrink and become more circular, as it has been doing for years.
The long axis of this characteristic storm is about 150 miles (240 kilometers) shorter now than it was in 2014.
Recently, the storm had been shrinking at a faster-than-usual rate, but the latest change is consistent with the long-term trend.

The observations are designed to capture a broad range of features, including winds, clouds, storms and atmospheric chemistry.
Ms Simon and her colleagues produced two global maps of Jupiter from observations made using Hubble’s high-performance Wide Field Camera 3.
The two maps represent nearly back-to-back rotations of the planet, making it possible to determine the speeds of Jupiter’s winds.
The new images confirm that the Great Red Spot continues to shrink and become more circular, as it has been doing for years.
The long axis of this characteristic storm is about 150 miles (240 kilometers) shorter now than it was in 2014.
Recently, the storm had been shrinking at a faster-than-usual rate, but the latest change is consistent with the long-term trend.

243total visits,1visits today

LEAVE A REPLY

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked ( required )

Keep in touch your friends and growup friendships through Social Networks……

Recent Tweet

Photo On Flickr